Review: The Night Bell by Inger Ash Wolfe

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The new novel in this acclaimed series is brilliantly paced, addictively suspenseful—the author’s best yet. Hazel Micallef (played by Susan Sarandon in the recent film of the series’ debut, The Calling) has become one of crime writing’s most memorable detectives. The Night Bell moves between the past and the present in Port Dundas, Ontario, as two mysteries converge. A discovery of the bones of murdered children is made on land that was once a county foster home. Now it’s being developed as a brand new subdivision whose first residents are already railing against broken promises and corruption. But when three of these residents are murdered after the discovery of the children’s bones, frustration turns to terror.While trying to stem the panic and solve two crimes at once, Hazel Micallef finds her memory stirred back to the fall of 1959, when the disappearance of a girl from town was blamed on her adopted brother. Although he is long dead, she begins to see the present case as a chance to clear her brother’s name, something that drives Hazel beyond her own considerable limits and right into the sights of an angry killer.

It seems that lately I have been giving books in a series a try. I used to only read books in a series if they were the first book in the series or if I had read the previous books. Well, The Night Bell doesn’t fall in either one of my categories as it is book number four of the Hazel Micallef series, but I still gave it a try. This novel employs the narrative technique of past and present times. The book starts in 1957 when Hazel was a young girl and introduces the story of the unsolved crime of child, which Hazel’s brother may or not have been a part of. Wolfe does a good job at telling these two parts of the story, the past 50 years ago, and the present times in 2007 and skillfully merges these two parts of the story for the great finale. Overall, this is a great mystery book with wonderful twists and an intricate plot. Does it do a good job as a stand alone novel? I didn’t think so. By book 4 of a series, there were a lot of characters that jumped in the story and that I had no clue who they were. It would’ve worked better if the author had re-introduced some of the characters for the people (like me) unfamiliar with the previous books. My bet is if you read the other books in the series you are going to love this new installment.

I’d like to thank NetGalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

3 star

Stacking The Shelves

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Stacking the Shelves is a weekly meme hosted by Tynga’s Review. This is a weekly post, usually on Sundays, where I’ll share the books that I’m adding to my shelves. I’ll include books I purchase, books from my local library, e-books, audiobooks, and books for review.

PURCHASED

Realm of Shadows by Heather Graham

This is my first Heather Graham book! yes, I know! Lately I’ve been on a vampire love probably induced by my new obsession–The Originals on Netflix. So I’m really looking forwad to starting this book.

 The Lightening Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #1) by Rick Riordan

I also started a family book club with my boys who are 9 and 11. They are starting to get into the realm of fantasy books, so I decided to give Percy Jackson a try.

The Year We Turned Forty by Liz Fenton and  Lisa Steinke

For my regular monthly book club, we picked The Year We Turned Forty. Many of my friends who come to my monthly book club meeting happen to be turning forty this year, so I think this book may generate a good discussion.

Books/ARCs For Review

The Loney by Andrew Michael Hurley (NetGalley)

The Travelers by Chris Pavone (First to Read)

The Night Bell by Inger Ash Wolfe (NetGalley)

Wishful Seeing by Janet Kellough (NetGalley)

So these are all the books I added to my shelves this past week. Please leave me a comment if you’ve read any of these books, or just to share what you’re reading this week 🙂