Forgotten Bones by Vivian Barz

42931506When small-town police officers discover the grave of a young boy, they’re quick to pin the crime on a convicted felon who lives nearby. But when it comes to murder, Officer Susan Marlan never trusts a simple explanation, so she’s just getting started. Meanwhile, college professor Eric Evans hallucinates a young boy in overalls: a symptom of his schizophrenia—or so he thinks. But when more bodies turn up, Eric has more visions, and they mirror details of the murder case. As the investigation continues, the police stick with their original conclusion, but Susan’s instincts tell her something is off. The higher-ups keep stonewalling her, and the FBI’s closing in. Desperate for answers, Susan goes rogue and turns to Eric for help. Together they take an unorthodox approach to the case as the evidence keeps getting stranger. With Eric’s hallucinations intensifying and the body count rising, can the pair separate truth from illusion long enough to catch a monster?


Forgotten Bones is not your average crime thriller, and I will go over why. The premise of the book is excellent. Susan, a young detective upon responding to a car accident scene, comes across the body of a young child. Police quickly attributes the crime to a local pedophile. However, Susan is suspicious that there is more to the story and decides to embark on an investigation on her own. Parallel to Susan’s story we meet Eric, a geology professor going through a turbulent divorce and moves to California to get away from his ex-wife who dumped him for his brother.

Eric settles in at the new college and town in an attempt to rebuild his life. Eric is a known schizophrenic, and although he’s entirely compliant to his medication regime, he starts to worry that his illness is getting worse as he starts to have visions of a little boy in overalls. Eric and Susan’s paths will cross, and together, they will fight to discover the truth regarding the death of this little kid.

Barz alternates chapters between Susan’s story and Eric’s story. A technique that for most of the time, tends to chop the flow of the story. The reason this book is not your typical crime/mystery book is the fact that there are no red herrings. What you see, or better yet, who you suspect all along, is in fact, the culprit(s).

By the time I got to sixty percent of the book and had the mystery pretty much figured out, there was very little interest in the rest of the story. I honestly do not understand the author’s intention with making the answers to this crime so visible right off the bat. I kept hoping that the story was going to turn out a bit like a Scooby-Doo cartoon where the obviously mean, greedy, and weird were innocent, and the super lovely characters turn out to be the guilty ones.

Unfortunately, no! This novel was written with the intent to make the guilty quite evident from the start. The pitfall, however, is that once the reader has the mystery figured out there’s very little substance to carry on the rest of the book.

Some important trigger warnings to mention are pedophilia (although not explicit), child abuse, and neglect.

Forgotten Bones is scheduled to be published on August 1, 2019. I would like to thank Thomas and Mercer publishing and NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.


Format: e-ARC, Kindle 298 pages
Published: Expected publication August 1st, 2019 by Thomas and Mercer
ASIN: B07KF46YBG
Source: Free copy provided by the publisher, Thomas and Mercer, and NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.
Rating: 3 stars
Genre: Crime, Suspense, Mystery

 

 

Where The Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

36809135For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.


We meet Kaya in 1952, and when Kya was only 6 years old, her mother ran away and left Kya alone with an abusive father. We follow this coming-of-age story of an abandoned young girl who survives on soda crackers and grits. Kya raises herself by the marsh that becomes her family and safe haven.

Faces change with life’s toil, but eyes remain a window to what was, and she could see him there.

Where The Crawdads Sing is Delia Owens’s debut novel and what a beautiful debut it is! I’m not sure I agree with how this book has been marketed as part coming-of-age, part mystery. The mystery part of the book is minimal. This lovely novel is a wonderful example of literary fiction. Kya is a great character, and we follow her on this journey as she grows and survives the things she does. Kya’s loneliness and abandonment make her a very sympathetic character. Owens’s poetic prose and brilliant descriptions of nature overshadow the unrealistic portions of the story and the chronological back-and-forth between the chapters.

Go as far as you can–way out yonder where the crawdads sing.

This is a beautifully written novel that deserves all the hype and recommendations it has received.


Format: Hardcover, 370 pages
Published: August 14th, 2018 by G.P. Putnam’s Sons
ISBN:0735219095
Source: Purchased
Rating: 4 stars
Genre: Fiction

The Song of The Jade Lily by Kirsty Manning (Tour Stop)

40042053In 2016, fleeing London with a broken heart, Alexandra returns to Australia to be with her grandparents, Romy and Wilhelm, when her grandfather is dying. With only weeks left together, her grandparents begin to reveal the family mysteries they have kept secret for more than half a century.  In 1939, two young girls meet in Shanghai, the ‘Paris of the East’: beautiful local Li and Viennese refugee Romy form a fierce friendship. But the deepening shadows of World War Two fall over the women as Li and Romy slip between the city’s glamorous French Concession and the desperate Shanghai Ghetto. Eventually, they are forced to separate ways as Romy doubts Li’s loyalties. After Wilhelm dies, Alexandra flies to Shanghai, determined to trace her grandparents’ past. As she peels back the layers of their hidden lives, she begins to question everything she knows about her family – and herself. A compelling and gorgeously told tale of female friendship, the price of love, and the power of hardship and courage to shape us all.


The book starts in Vienna in 1938 with Romy Bernfeld and her family attempting to flee Hitler’s reign and hatred towards the Jewish people. Unfortunately, immigrating to other countries in Europe turns out to be much harder than the family anticipated, so after suffering a horrible tragedy Romy and what’s left of her family is finally able to leave Europe and immigrate to Shanghai, China.

The Song of The Jade Lily is a story told in the third person with alternating chapters between 1938 and 2016 Australia. In 1939 we are introduced to Li, a beautiful Chinese girl who becomes Romy’s best friend. We follow their childhood, their troubles, and the horrors of war that loom over them. 2016, Alexandra leaves London to be with her grandmother Romy and her dying grandfather Wilhelm. Alexandra is determined to find the truth about the heritage of her adoptive mother, Sophia.

There were many beautiful parts of this book that I adored. I knew very little about Jewish refugees in China and was delighted to learn more about it. At times I felt the book’s alternating chapters format, and short chapters broke the flow of the narrative a bit. There were many characters introduced at the same time, which made it confusing at times.

Overall, Manning managed to magically weave this beautiful and compelling story of love, loyalty, secrets, and friendship amidst World War II.

I’d like to thank TLC Book Tours for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.


Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble


About Kirsty Manning

Kirsty Manning grew up in northern New South Wales, Australia. She has degrees in literature and communications and worked as an editor and publishing manager in book publishing for over a decade. A country girl with wanderlust, her travels and studies have taken her through most of Europe, the east, and west coasts of the United States as well as pockets of Asia. Kirsty’s journalism and photography specializing in lifestyle and travel regularly appear in magazines, newspapers, and online. She lives in Australia.

Find out more about Kirsty at her website, and connect with her on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.


Format: Paperback, 480 pages
Published: May 14th, 2019 by William Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN:0062882015
Source: Free copy provided by the publisher, William Morrow Paperbacks, and TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review
Rating: 4 stars
Genre: Historical Fiction

Last Summer by Kerry Lonsdale

42303291Lifestyle journalist Ella Skye remembers every celebrity she interviewed, every politician she charmed between the sheets and every socialite who eyed her with envy. The chance meeting with her husband, Damien; their rapid free fall into love; and their low-key, intimate wedding are all locked in her memory. But what she can’t remember is the tragic car accident that ripped her unborn child from her. Ella can’t even recall being pregnant. Hoping to find the memories of a lost pregnancy that’s left her husband devastated and their home empty, Ella begins delving into her past when she’s assigned an exclusive story about Nathan Donovan, a retired celebrity adventurer who seems to know more about her than she does him. To unravel the mystery of her selective memory loss, Ella follows Nathan from the snowcapped Sierra Nevada to the frozen slopes of southeast Alaska. There she discovers the people she trusts most aren’t the only ones keeping secrets from her—she’s hiding them from herself. Ella quickly learns that some truths are best left forgotten.


Ella Skye is a journalist who wakes up in a hospital with no recollection of her recent past, including the unborn baby she was carrying and lost during a tragic car accident. Resolved to understand the reasons behind her selective amnesia, Ella embarks on a journey through her past and events leading up to the fatal accident.

Last Summer is my first novel by Kerry Lonsdale, and I have to say that I really enjoyed it. I wasn’t sure about it going in. I felt the premise of the book was a bit over the top, and honestly, I was getting tired of this book genre. Much to my surprise, this book turned out to be a great page-turner that I just couldn’t put it down. I liked the characters, and I felt the dialogue was dynamic and well-paced. The plot was intriguing and full of twists and turns. I don’t want to give too much away as this book has an ending you won’t see coming.

I would like to thank Lake Union Publishing and NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.


Format: e-ARC, Kindle 297 pages
Published: Expected publication July 9th, 2019 by Lake Union Publishing
ASIN: B07HNSYCGG
Source: Free copy provided by the publisher, Lake Union Publishing, and NetGalley in exchange for my honest review
Rating: 4 stars
Genre: Chick-lit, Suspense

 

The Madonnas of Echo Park by Brando Skyhorse

8942147“We slipped into this country like thieves, onto the land that once was ours.” With these words, spoken by an illegal Mexican day laborer, The Madonnas of Echo Park takes us into the unseen world of Los Angeles, following the men and women who cook the meals, clean the homes, and struggle to lose their ethnic identity in the pursuit of the American dream.


The Madonnas of Echo Park is a collection of short stories by Mexican American writer Brando Skyhorse. Although I seldom review short stories on this blog, I couldn’t pass on the opportunity to pay homage to such beautiful work of literature.

Having won both the PEN/Hemingway Award and the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction, this novel really lives up to its hype. Each chapter is a different story told in first person in a beautifully crafted prose highlighting the intersections and clashes of American and Mexican culture.

In Los Angeles, you could rent an apartment, buy groceries, cash checks, and socialize, all in Spanish.

The Madonnas of Echo Park tells the stories of Mexican Americans in the constantly changing landscape of Los Angeles’s Echo Park neighborhood, a predominantly Latino community. This novel compiles a collection of interrelated stories that are heavily character-driven and that leave you contemplating the themes present in each story long after you finish reading the book.

“Faith is a luxury for those who are able to ignore what the rest of us must see every day. Pessimism, distrust, and irony are the holy trinity of my religion, irony in particular.”

“The time between your first major fight with your best friend until you make up is, for a teenage girl, about as long as it took for God to create the universe. . . . It’s excellent training for having a boyfriend.”


Format: Paperback240 pages
Published: February 8th, 2011 by Free Press (first published June 1st, 2010)
ISBN: 1439170843
Source: Purchased
Rating: 4 stars
Genre: Fiction

Gunpowder Moon by David Pedreira

36692151It’s 2072, and lunar helium-3 mining is powering the fusion reactors that are bringing Earth back from environmental disaster. But competing for the richest prize in the history of the world has destroyed the oldest rule in space: Safety for All. When a bomb kills one of Dechert’s diggers on Mare Serenitatis, the haunted veteran goes on the hunt to expose the culprit before more blood is spilled. But as Dechert races to solve the first murder in the history of the Moon, he gets caught in the crosshairs of two global powers spoiling for a fight. Reluctant to be the match that lights this powder-keg, Dechert knows his life and those of his crew are meaningless to the politicians. Even worse, he knows the killer is still out there, hunting. In his desperate attempts to save his crew and prevent the catastrophe he sees coming, the former Marine uncovers a dangerous conspiracy that, with one spark, can ignite a full lunar war, wipe out his team . . . and perhaps plunge the Earth back into darkness.


In 2072 the moon is populated by several international companies mining the moon’s soil for a substance known as Helium-3, a nonradioactive solar isotope that is easily contained and used to power reactors on Earth.

Caden Dechert is in charge of the American mining company. Things appeared to be running smoothly until one of Dechert’s crew member is found dead. Suspecting that the death was not an accident, Dechert races against time to find out the truth behind this lunar murder.

The gunpowder smell of moondust filled his nostrils, and his head hurt too much to work the mystery.

Gunpowder Moon is my sci-fi monthly book club pick, and I have to say I’m pleased we chose this novel. Sci-fi meets whodunnit mystery, Pedreira’s writing keeps you guessing until the end in this fast-paced story. I particularly enjoyed the tension he built in the book. As for character development, Dechert was by far the best. All the other characters felt a bit flat throughout the story. Pedreira did an excellent job researching the topic and moving the story nicely. This is not a very long book, and at times I wished that the sci-fi parts regarding the moon had been better explored. Overall, Gunpowder Moon was an interesting read.

That’s the moon, commissioner: hours of boredom followed by a few seconds of terror.


Format: Paperback, 289 pages
Published: February 13th, 2018 by Harper Voyager
ISBN: 0062676083
Source: Library loan
Rating: 3 stars
Genre: Sci-fi, Mystery

The Sunday Post/Book Haul

IMG_1619The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer. A post to recap the past week, and share news about the upcoming week. First Sunday of the month is also book haul Sunday. My monthly book haul is where I take an account of all the books I have acquired this past April. I don’t review all the books I read. Some books I’ll write a small review on Goodreads, some I’ll just rate, and some reviews I’ll publish on this blog. I list books I acquired through purchase, library loans, monthly book box subscription, ARCs, as well as books received from authors. My TBR list continues to grow and I’m hoping to get through most of these titles by the next book haul at the end of May.

Book Haul 3

HARDCOVERS

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I’m excited about reading The Secret Ingredient of Wishes by Susan Bishop Crispell. This is the story of a Rachel Monroe a twenty-six-year-old girl who has a secret—she can make people’s wishes come true. Unfortunately, sometimes granting people’s wishes can be disastrous, so Rachael leaves her hometown and finds herself in Nowhere, North Carolina.

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The Turn by Kim Harrison is the prequel to her series Hollow. In this prequel Trisk, and her rival Kal have a single goal—to save their species from extinction. When a genetically modified tomato created to feed the world is combined with a virus, a plague rises giving the paranormal species the choice to stay hidden and allow humanity to die or to show themselves in a bid to save the human race.

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I have very mixed feelings about reading Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincott. Being a nurse, I have never gravitated toward books about disease and illness. Dealing with the sick and the dying is part of my day job and one of the things I love about books is that they transport me to another world. Every now and then I’ll take a chance on a book that deals with topics of illness and hospitalizations. Five Feet Apart is the story of Stella Grant, a teenager suffering from cystic fibrosis. Stella is more than used to keeping people away and avoiding infections or anything that can threaten her chances of getting a lung transplant. One day she meets Will Newman, a kid who is the complete opposite of her. I sense this one will be a heartbreaker.

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Emily A. Duncan’s Wicked Saints came in my Owlcrate box for the month of April. I’ve been hearing a lot of good hype about this book which is the number one in the Dark and Holy series. This is the story of a girl who can speak to gods and now must save her people without destroying herself.

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Beyond the Point by Claire Gibson is the story of three women who on the eve of 9/11 realize that in order to survive, they’ll have to stick together.

PAPERBACKS

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I have been meaning to read The Stand by Stephen King for years. In this Horror, meets sci-fi, meets fantasy a patient escapes from a biological testing facility, unknowingly carrying a deadly weapon: a mutated strain of super-flu that will wipe out 99 percent of the world’s population within a few weeks.

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The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson is book one in the Mistborn series. I’m more than thrilled to read this book. I have heard so many great things about this series and this book in particular.

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Another book by Brandon Sanderson that I have been dying to read for the past at least three years is The Way of Kings, book one of The Stormlight Archive.  It took Sanderson ten years of planning, writing, and world building. I can’t wait!

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Probably one of my boldest literary endeavors this year. I have been intimidated by Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace for so many years that finally as one of my New Year’s resolution I have decided that this year of 2019 I was going to bite the bullet and tackle this big boy. This will not be my first time reading Tolstoy. I’ve read Anna Karenina and didn’t think it was that bad, so fingers crossed!

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Another book that first called my attention because of the beautiful cover was The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch. I have heard so many wonderful things about this book that I really need to check this one out.

What We Do for Love by Anne Pfeffer

What We Do for Love is a book by Anne Pfeffer I will be reviewing soon as part of a blog tour I’m doing with iRead Blog Tours. Looks interesting, loved the cover, let’s see!

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The Song of Jade and Lily by Kirsty Manning is another beautiful cover I’ll be reviewing soon as part of a blog tour with TLC book tours.

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The Mister by E.L. James seems like an interesting book, Let’s see if he can write more than Fifty Shades.

ARCs

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I received Last Summer by Kerry Lonsdale (NetGalley)

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One Night Gone by Tara Laskowski (NetGalley)

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Forgotten Bones by Vivian Barz (NetGalley)

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All Of Us With Wings by Michelle Ruiz Keil (Edelweiss)

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Mom’s Perfect Boyfriend by Crystal Hemmingway

LIBRARY LOANS

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Murder Past Due by Miranda Jones. Book one in a Cat in The Stacks Mystery

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The Overstory by Richard Powers

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Gunpowder Moon by David Pereira

AUDIOBOOKS

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Magyk by Angie Sage. Book one in the Septimus Heap series.


Have you read any of these titles? Any particular opinion on them? Please let me know on the comments below and HAPPY READING! 🙂

 

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

6288A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don’t know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food—and each other.


The Road starts in a post-apocalyptic world that explains very little if any of what the apocalyptic event was. Father and son are traveling through burned America. The land is full of ash and devoid of life, so to avoid the harsh winter, father and son set out to the coast. They have minimal possessions except for a revolver to protect them from “the bad guys”–the cannibals. Father and son endure several episodes of starvation and struggles trying to survive until they reach the coast.

The Road is a small book I read in a couple of hours. It’s a relatively simple book with a minimal plot. I was astounded to find out it had won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2007. Even more surprising to me was the amount of five and four-star reviews this book received on Goodreads.

One thing I love about literary fiction is its ability to free-flow and not follow grammatical rules to dictate its pursuit of more poetic prose. Unfortunately, I didn’t think this book was particularly poetic. McCarthy took a lot of freedom in his writing. Sometimes it worked, but for the majority of the book, it didn’t. I was annoyed at his lack of parentheses and lack of dialogue attribute, which made understanding who was saying what difficult at times. As far as dialogue goes the ones in this book were the simplest I’ve read in a long time.

Can I ask you something?

Yes. Of course.

Are we going to die?

Sometime. Not now.

And we’re still going south.

Yes.

So we’ll be warm.

Yes.

Okay.

Okay what?

Nothing. Just okay.

Go to sleep.

Okay.

The fact that The Road offers no answers whatsoever did not bother me at all. One redeeming quality of this novel was the bond between father and son. In a world where nothing is left, all they had were their love for each other.

You forget what you want to remember, and you remember what you want to forget.

I’m ready to forget this novel–wait! I already did.


Format: Kindle, 324 pages.
Published: March 20th, 2007 by Vintage (first published September 26th, 2006)
ASIN: B000OI0G1Q
Source: Library loan
Rating: 2 stars
Genre: Literary Fiction, Sci-Fi

Ship of Magic (Liveship Traders # 1) by Robin Hobb

618211Wizardwood, a sentient wood. The most precious commodity in the world. Like many other legendary wares, it comes only from the Rain River Wilds. But how can one trade with the Rain Wilders, when only a liveship fashioned from wizardwood can negotiate the perilous waters of the Rain River? Rare and valuable a liveship will quicken only when three members, from successive generations, have died on board. The liveship Vivacia is about to undergo her quickening as Althea Vestrit’s father is carried on deck in his death-throes. Althea waits for the ship that she loves more than anything else in the world to awaken. Only to discover that the Vivacia has been signed away in her father’s will to her brutal brother-in-law, Kyle Haven…Others plot to win or steal a liveship. The Paragon, known by many as the Pariah, went mad, turned turtle, and drowned his crew. Now he lies blind, lonely, and broken on a deserted beach. But greedy men have designs to restore him, to sail the waters of the Rain Wild River once more.


Ship of Magic is book one in The Liveship Traders series. It tells the story of the Vestrit family of traders from Bingtown. The story starts with the death of the patriarch Ephron Vestrit who dies on the Vivacia. The Vivacia is the family ship and a liveship, a magical ship made of Wizardwood (a substance that gives the ship its magical properties). When Ephron dies on board of the Vivacia, it allows the vessel to “quicken,” meaning the ship comes to life and becomes a sentient being. Althea is Ephron’s youngest daughter and the one who should have inherited the ship, but much to her surprise Ephron gives the ship to his older daughter Keffria who subsequently gives it to her husband, Kyle. Althea and Kyle cannot stand each other, and since the Vivacia needs a blood relative of the Vestrits to operate, Kyle orders his son Wintrow, who wanted to become a priest, to come on board of the ship making the boy’s life miserable. Parallel to this story, we meet Kennit, an ambitious pirate who dreams of one day uniting all pirate townships and conquering all pirate ships including the Vivacia.

If the 80s American soap-opera Dynasty had a nautical version, it would be called Ship of Magic. The amount of family drama in this book is unlike anything I have read in a long time. The first fifty percent of the book is just bickering between all members of the Vestrit family, especially between Althea and Kyle.

The pace of the book is irritatingly languid. To quote Stephen King, ” When a reader puts a story aside because it ‘got boring’, the boredom arose because the writer grew enchanted with the powers of description and lost sight of his priority…” Indeed the majority of the book is descriptions of people and places to the point you wonder if anything is ever going to happen in this novel, or if this story even has a plot. Ship of Magic does have a plot, and things do eventually start happening but much later in the book, and by then I had read several other novels in between.

At a hefty eight hundred and eight pages, at the end of this book, you feel like you have been reading about Kyle, Althea, Wintrow, Vivacia, and trade families for years. That might have been Hobb’s idea all along since this is book one in the series and the introduction to all the characters and this magical, nautical world. I was happy to have stuck with it, and I actually loved the story all things concerned. However, if you enjoy your fantasy books a little faster paced, Ship of Magic might not be for you.


Format: Hardcover, 880 pages
Published: February 2nd, 1999 by Spectra (first published March 1998)
ISBN:0553575635
Source: Library loan
Rating: 4 stars
Genre: Fantasy

Blood Orange by Harriet Tyce

37912970Alison has it all. A doting husband, adorable daughter, and a career on the rise – she’s just been given her first murder case to defend. But all is never as it seems…Alison drinks too much. She’s neglecting her family. And she’s having an affair with a colleague whose taste for pushing boundaries may be more than she can handle. But someone knows Alison’s secrets. Someone who wants to make her pay for what she’s done, and who won’t stop until she’s lost everything….


Less than a perfect wife and mother, Alison is an attorney with a drinking problem who is having an affair with a co-worker, and she just landed her first murder case. She is married to Carl, a struggling therapist who is also a stay-at-home-dad and mother to five-year-old Matilda (Tilly). Alison’s life is spiraling down to a complete disaster, as her marriage to Carl is falling apart she struggles with her destructive drinking and sordid affair with Patrick. Faced with her first murder case to defend, will there be hopes for Alison to regenerate, save her marriage, and become the loving, present, mother her daughter Tilly deserves?

This is an exciting, edge-of-your-seat, can’t-put-it-down sort of thriller. Tyce gets you hooked from the prologue. There are no slow, boring parts. You are taken down the same sordid and destructive path that Alison takes. Blood Orange is the sort of novel where you can’t tell the bad guys from the good guys and nothing; absolutely nothing is what it seems. My only gripe with this novel is that half-way through the book I felt the plot reminded me of some elements of another great British novel, B.A. Paris’s The Breakdown. I don’t want to reveal too much in fear that I might spoil the fun. Blood Orange is Harriet Tyce’s debut novel.


Format: Hardcover, 340 pages
Published: February 21st, 2019 by Wildfire (first published January 10th, 2019
ISBN:1472252756
Source: Library loan
Rating: 4 stars
Genre: Thriller