The Book Supremacy by Kate Carlisle

41832575Newlyweds Brooklyn and Derek are enjoying the final days of their honeymoon in Paris. As they’re browsing the book stalls along the Seine, Brooklyn finds the perfect gift for Derek, a first edition James Bond novel, The Spy Who Loved Me. When they bump into Ned, an old friend from Derek’s spy days, Brooklyn shows him her latest treasure. Once they’re back home in San Francisco, they visit a spy shop Ned mentioned. The owner begs them to let him display the book Brooklyn found in Paris as part of the shop’s first anniversary celebration. Before they agree, Derek makes sure the security is up to snuff—turns out, the unassuming book is worth a great deal more than sentimental value. Soon after, Derek is dismayed when he receives a mysterious letter from Paris announcing Ned’s death. Then late one night, someone is killed inside the spy shop. Are the murders connected to Brooklyn’s rare, pricey book? Is there something even more sinister afoot? Brooklyn and the spy who loves her will have to delve into the darkest parts of Derek’s past to unmask an enemy who’s been waiting for the chance to destroy everything they hold dear.


The Book Supremacy is the thirteenth book in the Bibliophile Mystery Series. I don’t usually read a book this far in a series if I haven’t read any of the previous books, but I decided to take a chance. I love cozy mysteries, and I kept hearing wonderful things about this series.

Indeed the plot was great! The mystery was good and not at all predictable. The pacing was just right with a narrative full of dynamic dialogues that made the story flow really smoothly. Brooklyn and Derek were great characters. Their relationship was cute–I just wished I knew more about their back story. I loved the fact that this book started in Paris and for the first chapters, I was really hooked. Having just visited Paris, it was a bit bitter-sweet for me, but Carlisle’s excellent descriptions of la Ville des Lumières really transported me back to one of my favorite cities in the world. Unfortunately, as the story went on, I just wasn’t as invested. The book has so many characters, friends, co-workers, and family members that had already been introduced in other installments, and since I’d never got to know these characters before, I had a hard time picturing them. I see why some people think this can be a standalone book. This book is a not a continuation of a previous story, per se, but I believe that for you to get into the story and appreciate these characters, you should read the earlier books in the series.

I received an early copy of this book for free from Penguin Random House First To Read in exchange for my honest review.


Format: e-ARC, 288 pages
Published: June 4th, 2019 by Berkley
ASIN: B07H72R95G
Source: Free copy provided by the publisher, Berkley, and Penguin Random House First To Read in exchange for my honest review
Rating: 3 stars
Genre: Cozy mystery

The Tell All by Libby Howard

35443185Kay Carrera is in her sixties and going through a lot. She is grieving the loss of her husband Eli and recovering from cataract surgery. Kay knows she can’t afford her house anymore and her only options are to either sell her home or have it repossessed. Luckily, her friend advises her to get a roommate to help pay for the costs. Judge Beck is going through a divorce and looking for a place to live with his children for a couple of years. It seems like the perfect solution for Kay’s problems, but when she accidentally finds a body, she is going to need all the help in the world to elude the killer who’s coming after her.

This is book one in the Locust Point Mystery Book series. At barely one hundred and fifty-three pages, this little story is interesting enough from a character development point of view but lacks substance for plot development.

One of the first things I noticed about the book was that the summary on Goodreads alluded to ghosts and Kay’s ability to see ghosts. I believe that might be something that will get covered in other books in the series, but this first book does not mention it at all.

The Tell-All is a cute, cozy mystery that gives an introduction of the main characters in this series. Kay is a lovable widow in her sixties who is just trying to rebuild her life after the death of her husband. She works part-time for a P.I., she finds a body and a mystery she needs to resolve. She owns a cat named Taco, and her best friend is Daisy. About half of the book is just about presenting these characters, and whatever is left of the book is rushed to explain the mystery.

I’m hopeful that the other books will have more room to develop an exciting plot and mystery.


Format: Kindle Edition, 153 pages
Published: July 24th, 2017
ASIN: B072R235GS
Series: Locust Point Mysteries #1
Source: Purchased
Rating: 3 stars
Genre: Cozy Mystery

Better Off Read by Nora Page

better off read

When her best hope of saving her storm-damaged library is found murdered, senior librarian Cleo Watkins hits the road in her bookmobile in search of justice. Septuagenarian librarian Cleo Watkins won’t be shushed when an upstart young mayor threatens to permanently shelve her tiny town’s storm-damaged library. She takes to her bookmobile, Words on Wheels, to collect allies and rally library support throughout Catalpa Springs, Georgia. However, Cleo soon rolls into trouble. A major benefactor known for his eccentric DIY projects requests all available books on getting away with murder. He’s no Georgia peach, and Cleo wonders if she should worry about his plans. She knows she should when she discovers him bludgeoned and evidence points to her best friend, Mary-Rose Garland. 

Review

Better Off Read is the first book in the Bookmobile Mystery series. The main character, Cleo Watkins is a librarian who also runs a bookmobile, words on wheels, in the city of Catalpa Springs, Georgia. Cleo is desperately trying to fix the damaged library and prevent the young mayor, Jeb Day, from closing it down. Cleo soon comes across the body of an old patron, Buford Krandall, and evidence seems to point to her friend Mary-Rose, so Cleo decides to solve the murder on her own and clear the name of her best friend.

Ok, so this book was the classic example of judging a book by its cover. I mean, isn’t this cover super cute? I loved everything about it–a cute cat, a cute dog, a bookmobile, all the elements for a great cozy mystery. Unfortunately, this book was quite disappointing to me. The premise is great, a librarian fighting to keep the city’s public library alive, a murder needing to be solved, a small town setting, Southern cooking, you name it. The problem with the story is that although the premise was great, the characters were very unrealistic and poorly developed. Cleo, the main character, is supposed to be this seventy-year-old lady who really seemed more like someone in their forties or fifties. It is not to say that a person in their seventies can’t be as active and energetic as Cleo, but it just didn’t feel that way when you were reading the book.

The story as a whole did not hold my interest and I found myself putting this book down way too many times. I really wanted to love this book, but it just didn’t do it for me. Since this is book one in the series, I believe there is still hope for the other books to come.

I would like to thank Crooked Lane Books and NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.


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