The Name Of The Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

2495567Told in Kvothe’s own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen. The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as a fugitive after the murder of a king form a gripping coming-of-age story unrivaled in recent literature.


The book starts with the protagonist, Kvothe, living a low-profile life as an innkeeper at the Waystone Inn and going by the name of Kote in the fictional world of Temerant. Kote runs the inn together with his assistant Bast. When Kote saves a traveling scribe known as Chronicler from being attacked by spider-like creatures called scrael, the Chronicler immediately recognizes Kote as the renowned Kvothe—an unequaled sword fighter and magician. The Chronicler asks permission to record Kvothe’s story. After pondering about it, Kvothe agrees to tell his story to the Chronicler but warns him that it will take three days to tell his story. The Name Of The Wind corresponds to day one of Kvothe’s story in the Kingkiller Chronicle trilogy.

It’s hard to believe that a book of this magnitude was Patrick Rothfuss’s first novel. Granted it took him several years to write it while he was pursuing his B.A. in English. The Name Of The Wind is not only an incredibly creative fantasy book, a coming-of-age like nothing I had read so far, but it is also a very well-written book. I loved the narrative, the poems, and songs in the story. Rothfuss’s use of a story-within-a-story format is what sets this book apart. To imagine an entire six-hundred-and-sixty-page book being day one in Kvothe’s story is mind-blowing, but it works because Rothfuss is so creative and descriptive with every scene in the book. I felt like I knew Kvothe on a personal level. You follow him from his early beginnings with his family—a troupe of traveling performers, through meeting his first teacher—Abenthy (Ben) to his years in the University. I’m not going to deny that as much as I loved Kvothe as a character, at times, I was annoyed by how good he was at everything. Even with this small flaw, Rothfuss still manages to make Kvothe a likable character who endures many challenges. Kvothe’s life is far from easy. He loses his family at the hands of evil mystical beings, the Chandrians, at a very early age, and his early life is plagued with violence and hunger.

When I first decided to read this novel, I remember being extremely skeptical. The Name Of The Wind is probably one of the best-rated fantasy books on Goodreads, right along legends such as Tolkien’s LOTR The Fellowship Of The Ring, with a rating of four and a half stars and more than five hundred thousand ratings. I have to admit after finishing book one in this trilogy that the hype is real and very well-deserved.

I’m definitely reading book two, The Wise Man’s Fear, and together with the fandom, I will anxiously await the release of the third book.

“Words are pale shadows of forgotten names. As names have power, words have power. Words can light fires in the minds of men. Words can wring tears from the hardest hearts.” 


Format: Hardcover, 662 pages
Published: April 2007 by Penguin Group DAW (first published March 27th, 2007)
ISBN: 075640407X
Source: Library loan
Rating: 5 stars
Genre: Fantasy, Epic Fantasy

7 thoughts on “The Name Of The Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

      • NoblemanWarrior

        Hey Anna!

        Sorry for the late response. Anyway, yes, I really like Stephen Lawhead, but I certainly do not get to read like I want to… I have only read a few of his books. I’m not sure if you would actually like him, but the description of this one reminded me of him. Two of his books I have started, but haven’t finished – no fault on him; I really liked them just ended up putting them down as life happened.

        He usually writes historical fiction books. I read his book St. Patrick which was good. I heard a great place to start is with his book Byzantium. My favorite is the King Raven Trilogy. It’s a historical retelling of the Robin Hood story, but really changes the historical setting and makes it much more believable then fellas running round the somewhat small Sherwood Forest in green tights. Each book is told from a different character’s perspective.

        Anyway, not sure if you would like him at all and you obviously have a lot on your reading list already. I just get all excited about books when I read your reviews and my nerd gets stirred up (as I push my glasses up my face!).

        Have a wonderful evening. Sorry for bombarding your page!

        😐 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Anna

        He sounds really interesting. I know what you mean, reading anything over 400 pages is hard lately with work and life. That is probably why I don’t review a lot of fantasy books. I love them, but it takes me a while to finish them. I will check Stephen Lawhead’s books because they sound interesting, specially the Robin Hood trilogy. At least he will make it to my TBR, let’s see if I get to read it this year.

        Liked by 1 person

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